• Keeping Kids Off the Summer Slide

    Something is waiting for many children each summer and their parents don’t even know it’s out there. It's called the "summer slide," and it describes what happens when young minds sit idle for three months. 

    As parents approach the summer break, many are thinking about the family vacation, trips to the pool, how to keep children engaged in activities at home, the abrupt changes to everyone's schedule—and how to juggle it all. What they might not be focusing on is how much educational ground their children could lose during the three-month break from school, particularly when it comes to reading.

    Summer slide affects millions of children each year in this country—but it doesn't have to. Other articles in the "Motivating Kids to Read Section" offer tips for parents, caregivers, and members of community organizations to help keep learning fun throughout the summer break and the rest of the year.

    READ & SING with your child

  • Three Ways to Prevent Summer Slide

    Try these strategies to help your reader improve her reading during the summer and beyond.
     

    LEARNING BENEFITS

    Hover over each Learning Benefit below for a detailed explanation.
    Reading

    Many children, especially struggling readers, forget some of what they've learned or slip out of practice during the summer months. Try these strategies to help your reader improve her reading during the summer and beyond:
     

    1. Six books to summer success: Research shows that reading just six books during the summer may keep a struggling reader from regressing. When choosing the six, be sure that they are just right — not too hard and not too easy. Take advantage of your local library. Ask for help selecting books that match your child's age, interests, and abilities. Libraries often run summer reading programs that motivate kids to read, so find out what's available in your area. Also check our book lists for recommendations.
       
    2. Read something every day: Encourage your child to take advantage of everyopportunity to read. Find them throughout the day:
      • Morning: The newspaper — even if it is just the comics or today's weather.
         
      • Daytime: Schedules, TV guides, magazines, online resources, etc. For example, if your daughter likes the food channel, help her look for a recipe on the network's Web site — then cook it together for more reading practice.
         
      • Evening: End the day by having your child read to you from the book he is currently reading (one of the six books, above). Have him rehearse a paragraph, page, or chapter before reading to you. Rereading will help him be more fluent — able to read at an appropriate speed, correctly, and with nice expression.
    3. Keep reading aloud: Reading aloud benefits all children and teens, especially those who struggle. One benefit is that you can read books your child can't, so she will build listening comprehension skills with grade-level and above books. This will increase her knowledge and expand her experience with text, so that she will do better when she reads on her own.

    It's hard to keep up a reading routine in a season packed with distractions and diversions. These suggestions will fit into a busy schedule and make reading fun!

  • LOCAL SPACES

  • Camp Invention at Bourbonnais Schools- Summer 2016

    Camp Invention is returning to Bradley Schools the Summer of 2017. Look for schoalrship opportunites Winter of 2016!

  • MORE IDEAS